"Maui," the demi-god who fished the Hawaiian islands from the sea. By Brittney Lee.

"Maui," the demi-god who fished the Hawaiian islands from the sea. By Brittney Lee. I love this legend. He is also a demi-god in New Zealand.

The Polynesian goddess of night, darkness and death; queen of the underworld. She is called 'Great Lady of the Night'. Hine-nui-te-Po is the daughter of Tane and Hina. When she learned that Tane, who took her as his wife, was also her father, she fled to the underworld where she rules ever since.

The Polynesian goddess of night, darkness and death; queen of the underworld…

Te Whiti o Tu - Maori Legend - Read the story here - http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/artwork/12076/rehutai-and-tangimoana

Te Whiti o Tu - Maori Legend - Read the story here…

New Zealand birds poster New Zealand art Bird by tinykiwiprints

New Zealand birds poster poster Tui par tinykiwiPrints sur Etsy

Tane Mahuta- Maori myth: the god of forests and birds.

Tane Mahuta- Maori myth: the god of forests and birds.

Teko Teko Pukana

Teko Teko Pukana

In Maori traditions(Aotearoa\NZ) Hine-tītama was the daughter of the god Tāne(Forest realm) and Hineahuone(the first woman), formed by Tāne from the earth. Hine-tītama later fled to the underworld and became Hine-nui-te-pō, the goddess of death.

'Hinetitama' 1980 (oil on board) by Robyn Kahukiwa.

In Maori traditions(Aotearoa) Taranga, the mother of Māui, stands over her newborn son, who floats on the ocean. Above her the baby lies on his mother's hair. When he was stillborn she set him into the sea wrapped in her tikitiki, a topknot of hair. Māui became known as Māui-tikitiki-a-Taranga. On one side of Taranga Māui, as a kererū, looks down on his father, and on her other side are Māui's brothers. In this tradition, Māui washed ashore and was raised by his grandfather.

In Maori traditions(Aotearoa) Taranga, the mother of Māui, stands over her…

could be my rendition of Mahuika, Maori goddess of fire…

onesian: “ could be my rendition of Mahuika, Maori goddess of fire… ”

Hine-nui-i-te-po (Ancestress of the Night) by June Northcroft Grant: Hine-nui-te-pō ("Great woman of night") is a goddess of night and death and the ruler of the underworld in Māori mythology. She is a daughter of Tāne. She fled to the underworld because .... The red colour of sunset comes from her. Finish the myth - And that is why today red is the colour of the sunset.

Hine-nui-i-te-po (Ancestress of the Night) by June Northcroft Grant / Embodied

Rongo and Haumia- Maori myth: the god of cultivated food and the god of wild food. They were brothers and both attacked by their other brother, the storm god. They hid in the body of Papa, Mother Earth.

Rongo and Haumia- Maori myth: the god of cultivated food and the god of wild food. They were brothers and both attacked by their other brother, the storm god. They hid in the body of Papa, Mother Earth.

Tumatauenga- Maori myth: the god of war and balance. He is the ancestor of humankind. He subdued his brothers that represent animals and the earth except his brother of the storms. Humans now war because he set the example.

Tūmatauenga – Te whānau tamariki – pregnancy and birth

Tāmure and Kaiwhare - one of the many legends of the Taniwha (http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/artwork/10896/tamure-and-kaiwhare)

Tāmure and Kaiwhare – Taniwha

Tāwhirimātea, god of weather

Tāwhirimātea, god of weather Father of Tanaki

Tangoroa- Maori myth: the god of the sea. His children were fish and reptiles. He has a rivalry with the forest

Tangaroa (also Takaroa) is one of the great gods, the god of the sea. He is a son of Ranginui and Papatuanuku, Sky and Earth

Rehutai & Tangimoana painting - Bronwyn Waipuka Rehutai & Tangimoana - beautiful twin sisters -lived on the Ruamāhanga River & fell in love w/ Rautoroa, a handsome warrior Tangimoana tricked her sister in a contest fetching him water. When Rahuiti returned, Tangimoana wore his cloak which made her his wife. Distressd Rehutai hid, weeping. At Dawn she climbed a hill into the clouds. The hill "Ōhine-mokemoke – the place of the lonely girl" www.teara.govt

Te Whiti o Tu - The story of two sisters. Rehutai (mist of the breaking surf) and Tangimoana (the voice of the breaking surf) 2004 This painting by Bronwyn Waipuka illustrates a story by Wairarapa kaumātua (elder) Mita Carter.

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