In 1930 Albert Gobder copied the decorative Maori patterns known as kowhaiwhai from Nga Tau e Waru meeting house in what is now the Masterson district of New Zealand.  Photograph courtesy Alexander Turnbull Library

Albert Gobder copy of Maori pattern, 'kowhaiwhai from Nga Tau e Waru meeting house' 1930

ephemeral art | Ngairo Rakai Hikuroa

Tā moko is the art of facial and body tattooing among the Māori of New Zealand, Portrait of Ngairo Rakai Hikuroa, 1873 byGottfried Lindauer

Mrs J A Jury is probably the wife of John Alfred Te Whatahoro Jury (Te Whatahoro) of Papawai; however, Te Whatahoro had nine wives over a period of fifty years, and there is no information about which wife the woman in this photograph may be. The moko of the woman on the right identifies her as Te Aitu-o-te-rangi Wikitoria Jury (daughter of Te Whatahoro Jury).

The late and early century photographs show some of the last Maori women to wear the traditional ta moko face marking in New Zealand before it was outlawed by British colonialists.

HoaniTe whatahoro Jury 1841-1923,Ngati Kahungunu Scholar.

HoaniTe whatahoro Jury 1841-1923,Ngati Kahungunu Scholar.

1890s - 1900s    Kotahitanga - Maori Parliament    Delegations from many tribal areas meet at Papawai Marae near Greytown to discuss important issues at the Kotahitanga. After talks with Premier Richard Seddon and King Mahuta in 1897, the Maori Parliament supports a petition to Queen Victoria that all remaining Maori land should be protected.

Aratoi’s Pathways, A brief timeline of the Wairarapa

Nga Tau E Waru is built  The wharenui Nga Tau E Waru (The eight years) at Te Ore Ore marae east of Masterton was built between 1878 -79. Paora Potangaroa, of Te Hika o Papauma, built Nga Tau E Waru on behalf of his Ngati Hamua relations. The house was one of the biggest of its time at 96 feet long and 30 feet wide It was also significant because of the unique patterns used in its carvings.

Nga Tau E Waru is built The wharenui Nga Tau E Waru (The eight years) at Te Ore Ore marae east of Masterton was built between 1878 -79. Paora Potangaroa, of Te Hika o Papauma, built Nga Tau E Waru on behalf of his Ngati Hamua relations. The house was one of the biggest of its time at 96 feet long and 30 feet wide It was also significant because of the unique patterns used in its carvings.

Piiata Lights - Te Reo Lightboxes - Turangawaewae  I sooo want one of these!!

Piiata Lights - Te Reo Lightboxes - Turangawaewae I sooo want one of these!

At this time the local Māori were in the process of settling a dispute with the Government over the Wairarapa Moana. Women had had a long history of involvement in land issues in this area. In 1889 Pākehā county council workers attempted to reduce the level of the lake by digging an opening to the sea. Local Māori women sat on their shovels and stopped them from carrying out the work. Te Kotahitanga met twice at Pāpāwai; in 1897 and again in 1898. It was reported that equal numbers of men…

At this time the local Māori were in the process of settling a dispute with the Government over the Wairarapa Moana. Women had had a long history of involvement in land issues in this area. In 1889 Pākehā county council workers attempted to reduce the level of the lake by digging an opening to the sea. Local Māori women sat on their shovels and stopped them from carrying out the work. Te Kotahitanga met twice at Pāpāwai; in 1897 and again in 1898. It was reported that equal numbers of men…

Image : Tamahau Mahupuku, with other leaders at Pāpāwai.       The women have not been identified but may have included two of Tamahau’s wives, Areta and Raukura, and his cousin Niniwa i te Rangi. All three were involved in Te Kotahitanga; Raukura worked on the newspaper Te Puke Ki Hikurangi with Niniwa i te Rangi. Areta was often prominent at meetings and other social gatherings of the time. [Alexander Turnbull Library]

Image : Tamahau Mahupuku, with other leaders at Pāpāwai. The women have not been identified but may have included two of Tamahau’s wives, Areta and Raukura, and his cousin Niniwa i te Rangi. All three were involved in Te Kotahitanga; Raukura worked on the newspaper Te Puke Ki Hikurangi with Niniwa i te Rangi. Areta was often prominent at meetings and other social gatherings of the time. [Alexander Turnbull Library]

Image : Tamahau Mahupuku, with other leaders at Pāpāwai.       The women have not been identified but may have included two of Tamahau’s wives, Areta and Raukura, and his cousin Niniwa i te Rangi. All three were involved in Te Kotahitanga; Raukura worked on the newspaper Te Puke Ki Hikurangi with Niniwa i te Rangi. Areta was often prominent at meetings and other social gatherings of the time. [Alexander Turnbull Library]

Image : Tamahau Mahupuku, with other leaders at Pāpāwai. The women have not been identified but may have included two of Tamahau’s wives, Areta and Raukura, and his cousin Niniwa i te Rangi. All three were involved in Te Kotahitanga; Raukura worked on the newspaper Te Puke Ki Hikurangi with Niniwa i te Rangi. Areta was often prominent at meetings and other social gatherings of the time. [Alexander Turnbull Library]

Tekoteko, carved figures of ancestors, stand guard on the perimeter of the Papawai marae, overlooking the marble monument to Tamahau Mahupuku.

Tekoteko, carved figures of ancestors, stand guard on the perimeter of the Papawai marae, overlooking the marble monument to Tamahau Mahupuku.

Takitimu A History of Ngati Kahungunu

Takitimu A History of Ngati Kahungunu J. Mitchell Handsome new edition of major tribal history is available from tomorrow .

Tekoteko, carved figures of ancestors, stand guard on the perimeter of the Papawai marae, overlooking the marble monument to Tamahau Mahupuku.

Tekoteko, carved figures of ancestors, stand guard on the perimeter of the Papawai marae, overlooking the marble monument to Tamahau Mahupuku.

Te Puke Ki Hikurangi  It will be ears and voice for us who remain in ignorance of the enormous tasks of Te Kotahitanga. Te Puke ki Hikurangi December 21, 1897    Maori were quick to take up the use of new technology and there was no better example than the use of a printing press at Papawai. Tamahau Mahupuku started Te Puke ki Hikurangi newspaper at Papawai in 1897. The proceedings of the Maori Parliament were regularly reported in Te Puke.

Te Puke Ki Hikurangi It will be ears and voice for us who remain in ignorance of the enormous tasks of Te Kotahitanga. Te Puke ki Hikurangi December 21, 1897 Maori were quick to take up the use of new technology and there was no better example than the use of a printing press at Papawai. Tamahau Mahupuku started Te Puke ki Hikurangi newspaper at Papawai in 1897. The proceedings of the Maori Parliament were regularly reported in Te Puke.

NGÄTI HÄMUA ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION SHEETS

NGÄTI HÄMUA ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION SHEETS

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