On this day 6th January, 1066 the last Anglo-Saxon King of England Harold II was crowned. He reigned for ten months before he died at the Battle of Hastings, fighting the Norman invaders led by William the Conqueror. Harold was the first of only three Kings of England to have died in battle, the other being Richard I and Richard III

king-harold-ii-harold-godwinson-house-of-wessex-Last Anglo-Saxon king of England, January to October He was defeated and killed by William of Normandy (William the Conqueror) at the Battle of Hastings.

The Battle of Normandy in 1944, codenamed "Operation Overlord" WWII.

The Battle of Normandy Map ~ Normandy ~ France ~ June 1944 ~ "Operation Overlord" ~ World War II

Operation Overlord began on 6 June 1944. It involved 160 000 Allied troops at the Battle of Normandy and the D-Day Landings, and by August there were over 3 000 000 Allied troops in France.

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The Battle of Normandy Map ~ Normandy ~ France ~ "Operation Overlord" began on June It involved 160 000 Allied troops at the Battle of Normandy and the D-Day Landings. By August there were over 000 Allied troops in France. ~ World War II

The Battle of Hastings occurred on 14 October 1066 during the Norman conquest of England, between the Norman-French army of Duke William II of Normandy and the English army under King Harold II. It took place at Senlac Hill, approximately 7 miles (11 kilometres) northwest of Hastings, close to the present-day town of Battle, East Sussex, and was a decisive Norman victory.

The Battle of Hastings occurred on 14 October 1066 during the Norman conquest of…

William as depicted in the Bayeux Tapestry during the Battle of Hastings, lifting his helm to show that he is still alive  King of England

William I (Old Norman: Williame I; 1028 – 9 September usually known as William the Conqueror, was the first Norman King of England, reigning from 1066 until his death in The descendant of Viking raiders, he launched the Norman conquest of England in

The Ultimate Embroidery - The Bayeux Tapestry is an embroidered cloth—not an actual tapestry—nearly 70 metres (230 ft) long, which depicts the events leading up to the Norman conquest of England concerning William, Duke of Normandy and Harold, Earl of Wessex, later King of England, and culminating in the Battle of Hastings.

the Bayeaux Tapestry depicting the Battle of Hastings - a victory that gave the British crown to William the Conqueror, a Norman.

Edward the Confessor was the second-last Anglo-Saxon king of England, ruling from 1042 until 1066. It was confusion, disagreement, and treachery over who his successor should be that led to the Norman Conquest. The two rivals for the throne were Harold (the last Anglo-Saxon king) and William of Normandy, whose army killed Harold in the Battle of Hastings.

Edward the Confessor - the last but one Anglo-Saxon king of England. He ruled England from 1042 until his death

William the Conqueror  William was born in around 1028, in Falaise, Normandy. William was duke of Normandy and, as William I, the first Norman king of England. He defeated and killed the last Anglo-Saxon king of England, King Harold II, at the Battle of Hastings. He was known as 'William the Bastard' to his contemporaries.

William the conqueror invaded England in 1066 and merged feudal techniques with more centralized government.

German paratroopers. France , Normandie 1944

Normandie, Fallschirmjäger - Category:Battle of Normandy - Wikimedia Commons

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