FDR's drafts of his Day of Infamy speech. Could be good to discuss drafting and revising with students.

FDR's drafts of his Day of Infamy speech. Could be good to discuss drafting and revising with students.

Day of Infamy attack on Pearl Harbor

This was the cover of TIME Magazine on the anniversary of the attack. Even fifty years after the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, America had not forgotten about it.

Read FDR's Famous 'Day of Infamy' Speech given to Congress asking to Declare War

Read FDR's Famous 'Day of Infamy' Speech

President Roosevelt delivers the "Day of Infamy" speech to a joint session of Congress on December Behind him are Vice President Henry Wallace (left) and Speaker of the House Sam Rayburn. To the right, in uniform, is Roosevelt's son James.

After the Day of Infamy "Man on the Street" Interviews and other audio collections from the Library of Congress

Man on the Street Interviews after the attack on Pearl Harbor - Library of Congress

On a quiet afternoon in December 1941, the President was in his study working on his stamp album. The telephone rang, and the White House operator put through the call. FDR learned that the Japanese had attacked Pearl Harbor just before 8 a.m. Hawaii time. Prologue takes you through the various drafts of FDR’s so-called “Day of Infamy” speech, with images of pages with his hand-written changes in wording and updates on Japanese attacks on other U.S. installations in the Pacific.

Draft of FDR’s “Day of Infamy” Speech. December A few hours after learning of the attacks on Pearl Harbor, President Franklin D. Roosevelt dictated a short address to be delivered to a Joint.

Day of Infamy - Autumn Update adds map based on Day of Defeat's Thunder BattlEye anti-cheat

Day of Infamy : Du contenu pour le film Dunkerque

Picture of President Franklin Roosevelt delivering his Day of Infamy speech. - (Public domain) on December 8, 1941.

Read FDR's Famous 'Day of Infamy' Speech

Picture of President Franklin Roosevelt delivering his Day of Infamy speech. - (Public domain) on December

June 23, 2008 is the "Charismatic Day of Infamy" and you are NOT supposed  to know about it or even talk about it.   If everyone knew about what happened on this day (and stopped making  excuses for it) a whole bunch of false teachers would put their tail  between their legs, pack up their bags and go home. The "New Apostolic  Reformation," the "Signs and Wonders Movement," the Hyper-Charismatic  Movement (whatever it's being called at the moment) should not even exist.   Here's a video…

The Charismatic Day of Infamy: June 23rd 2008

Commodore's log, October 27, 2158. We all knew this day'll come. But we were lucky. The Romulan invasion of Denobula gave us time to prepare. It's now or never. Losing this battle means certain def...

Commodore& starlog, 21 December, We all know both sides are exhausted. We have to keep pushing, as long as we defeat our faceless enemies.

Another Day of Infamy: Airing of the First TV Commercial - http://www.newenglandhistoricalsociety.com/another-day-of-infamy-airing-of-the-first-tv-commercial/

was a day of infamy long before Pearl Harbor. The world's first TV commercial was aired from a television studio on Brookline Avenue in Boston.

AVIATION ART HANGAR - Aviation art of Robert Taylor, John Shaw, William S. Phillips and others.

Aviation art of Robert Taylor, John Shaw, William S. Phillips and others.

Day of Infamy Speech Analysis: Students read FDR's address to Congress asking for a declaration of war after the Japanese attack at Pearl Harbor during World War 2 (WW2, WWII) and answer 13 questions. The answers are included where appropriate. This would be great for a sub!

Day of Infamy Speech Analysis

Students read FDR's Day of Infamy Speech on Japan's surprise attack at Pearl Harbor during World War 2 WWII) and answer 12 questions of varying levels of difficulty. The answers are included where appropriate.

Following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Franklin Roosevelt drafted his Dec. 8, 1941 speech to Congress without the aid of his speechwriters, dictating to secretary Grace Tully. This draft shows the quick annotations and edits that the President made on a first pass; an article in the National Archives’ magazine Prologue contains pages from...

FDR’s First Draft of His “Day of Infamy” Speech, With His Notes

First draft of FDR's Day of Infamy speech originally read "A date which will live in world history"

HARDCOVER - The Other Side of Infamy: My Journey through Pearl Harbor and the World of War

HARDCOVER - The Other Side of Infamy: My Journey through Pearl Harbor and the World of War

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