A kelpie is a horse like creature that will lure humans to sit on their back and will then drag them underwater to their deaths. Some legends say they can transform into people. Always dripping wet or covered in sea weeds. -Rain http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kelpie

The Kelpie is a supernatural water horse from Celtic folklore. They tend to be malevolent in nature. They are able to transform (usually into beautiful women) and lure victims into the water to drown them.

The púca (Irish for spirit/ghost) is primarily a creature of Irish folklore. Considered to be bringers both of good and bad fortune, they could either help or hinder rural and marine communities. The creatures were said to be shape changers which could take the appearance of black horses, goats and rabbits #folklore

The púca (Irish for spirit/ghost), pooka, phouka, phooka, phooca or púka is primarily a creature of Irish folklore.

Enfield: European Heraldry Morphology: There is no definitive description, but all Enfields will share the head of a fox and the forelegs of an eagle. Other versions can include the chest of a greyhound or lion and the hindquarters of a wolf.

Enfield - head of a fox, forelegs like an eagle's talons, the chest of a greyhound, the body of a lion, the hindquarters and tail of a wolf.

I found this myth somewhere and look at the symbol guys...

🐺 janedoodles: “ lungri: “ I read an Anglo-Norman lai of Celtic origin about a werewolf when I was at university. The King invites him into his court… then into his bed… then kisses him ‘’over 100 times’’. And that’s literally the end of the.

SELKIE    [noun]    (also known as silkies or selchies) mythological creatures found in Faroese, Icelandic, Irish, and Scottish folklore. The word derives from earlier Scots selich, (from Old English seolh meaning seal). Selkies are said to live as seals in the sea but shed their skin to become human on land. The legend apparently originated on the Orkney and Shetland Islands and is very similar to those of swan maidens.

SELKIE [noun] (also known as silkies or selchies) mythological creatures found in Faroese, Icelandic, Irish, and Scottish folklore. The word derives from earlier Scots selich, (from Old English seolh meaning seal). Selkies are said to live as seals

A Gancanagh (from Irish: Gean Cánach meaning "love talker") is a male faerie in Irish mythology that is known for seducing human women. The Gancanagh are thought to have an addictive toxin in their skin that make the humans they seduce literally addicted to them. The women seduced by this type of faerie typically die from the withdrawal, pining away for the Ganacanagh's love or fighting to the death for his love.

Six Celtic Mythological Creatures you may not know

A Gancanagh (from Irish: Gean Cánach meaning "love talker") is a male faerie in Irish mythology that is known for seducing human women.

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