Yuri Kochiyama, Japanese-American activist, Malcolm X Ally and a former member of the Black Panther Party has died at the age of 93. She spent two years in an internment camp and helped win reparations for Japanese-Americans.

Japanese-American human rights activist, Yuri Kochiyama. She cradled Malcolm X’s head as he lay dying.

Richard Aoki, a founding member of the Black Panther Party. He was Japanese American. What many people fail to realize is that Asian Americans were just as involved in the Civil Rights Movement as African Americans. In watching African Americans expose institutional racism and government hypocrisy, Asian Americans began to identify the ways in which they, too, had faced discrimination in the U.S.

RICHARD AOKI, who joined the Black Panther Party for Self Defense shortly after its founding in 1966 by his friends and fellow college students Huey Newton and Bobby Seale, displays a Black-Asian unity sign at a 1968 Black Panther rally. Asian Americans c

During World War II Japanese Americans experienced this sort of fear and hatred in a place they thought of as home.

Historical Links

Anti-Japanese Sign - Executive Order 9066 - WW ll Japanese Internment Camp - March 1942

Yuri Kochiyama, Japanese member of the Black Panther Party.

Not Just A 'Black Thing': An Asian-American's Bond With Malcolm X

Ben Kuroki, the only Japanese-American of the US Army to see air combat in the Pacific Theater during World War II. He flew a total of 58 combat missions over Europe and the Pacific during the war and eventually earned three Distinguished Flying Crosses. When asked about the prejudice that almost prevented him from service, Kuroki said: "I had to fight like hell for the right to fight for my own country."

Ben Kuroki, the only Japanese-American of the US Army to see air combat in the Pacific Theater (and the European) during World War II, flying a total of 58 combat missions during the war,

19 Feb 42: In what can only be called "not his finest hour," President Roosevelt signs Executive Order 9066, authorizing the Secretary of War to prescribe certain areas as military zones "from which any or all persons may be excluded," clearing the way for the relocation of 120,000 Japanese-Americans to internment camps, 11,000 people of German ancestry, and 3,000 of Italian decent. #WWII #History

19 Feb In what can only be called "not his finest hour," President Roosevelt…

In the Belly of the Monster: Asian American Opposition to the Vietnam War - Densho: Japanese American Incarceration and Japanese Internment

In the Belly of the Monster: Asian American Opposition to the Vietnam War - Densho: Japanese American Incarceration and Japanese Internment

Japanese Internment: Poston - Framework - Photos and Video - Visual Storytelling from the Los Angeles Times

Japanese Internment: Poston

Los Angeles Times staff photographer George Watson and staff representative Chester G. Hanson take a tour of the Poston War Relocation Center, home for Japanese-Americans.

After the invasion of Hong Kong & attack on Pearl Harbour, Japanese Canadians living in Canada were being detained in Internment Camps because Canadians believed that they were spies from Japan & possible threats to Canada. - During this time, Canadians were being racist to the Japanese people and forcing them in to camps were everyone, including the young, old, sick & disabled were forced to live in poor living conditions especially during the harsh winters.

Internment of Japanese-Americans and Japanese-Canadians

Governmental Notice to Japanese Canadians. What happened to Japanese-Americans in the US also happened in Canada to Japanese-Canadians largely due to public pressure.

Interment camps for the Japanese during WWII in the US we need to remember so it never happens again.

Japanese American internment was the World War II internment in "War Relocation Camps" of about people of Japanese heritage who lived on the Pacific coast of the United States. Sixty-two percent of the internees were American citizens.

In the Belly of the Monster: Asian American Opposition to the Vietnam War - Densho: Japanese American Incarceration and Japanese Internment

In the Belly of the Monster: Asian American Opposition to the Vietnam War - Densho: Japanese American Incarceration and Japanese Internment

Un-american : The Internment of Japanese Americans: Images by Dorothea Lange, Ansel Adams, and Other

Un-american : The Internment of Japanese Americans: Images by Dorothea Lange, Ansel Adams, and Other

Japanese-American children at Jerome War Relocation Center, Arkansas, 18 Jan 1944 (US National Archives)

[Photo] Japanese-American children at Jerome War Relocation Center, Arkansas, United States, 18 Jan 1944

Japanese-American children at Jerome War Relocation Center, Jerome, Arkansas, 18 Jan 1944 (US National Archives)

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