Enjoying Cherry Blossom Viewing at Ueno Toyohara Chikanobu

Utagawa (Gountei) Sadahide, Drawing Room of a Foreign Business Establishment in…

Teenager Meiji Emperor with foreign representatives 1868 1870 - Emperor Meiji…

A teenage Emperor Meiji with foreign representatives at the end of the Boshin War,

Find out more about the history of Tokugawa Period and Meiji Restoration, including videos, interesting articles, pictures, historical features and more. Get all the facts on HISTORY.com

Find out more about the history of Tokugawa Period and Meiji Restoration…

The four "Takasu" brothers, Matsudaira,  Sadaaki, Yoshikatsu, and Mochiharu, they had highly influential roles during the Meiji Restoration.

The four Takasu brothers—Matsudaira, Sadaaki, Yoshikatsu, and Mochiharu; each had a highly influential role during the Meiji Restoration.

As the calendar turns to 2018, the Japanese will be celebrating Oshogatsu, a unique tradition marking the beginning of a new year. Oshogatsu, also called shōgatsu, is initially based on the Chinese lunar calendar. But in 1873, five years after the Meiji restoration, Japan adopted the Gregorian calendar and started celebrating its cultural New Year’s …

How the Japanese Celebrate Oshogatsu, Their Version of New Year

meiji-restoration-3547460 by ACS (Barker Road) 4Science1 via Slideshare

by ACS (Barker Road) via Slideshare

Shibusawa Eiichi, 1st Viscount Shibusawa was a Japanese industrialist widely known today as the "father of Japanese capitalism". He spearheaded the introduction of Western capitalism to Japan after the Meiji Restoration. March 16, 1840, November 11, 1931.

Shibusawa Eiichi, Viscount Shibusawa was a Japanese industrialist widely known today as the "father of Japanese capitalism". He spearheaded the introduction of Western capitalism to Japan after the Meiji Restoration.

How the Meiji Restoration Ended Shogun Rule: The Meiji Emperor and his family, circa 1880.  The adults wear western-style clothes.

How the Meiji Restoration Ended Shogunal Rule in Japan

How the Meiji Restoration Ended Shogun Rule: The Meiji Emperor and his family, circa The adults wear western-style clothes.

Komuso, members of a zen sect of Buddhism, playing their shakuhatchi/bamboo flutes and collecting alms. // photo by Julian Cochrane, 1904 -- click for more info: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Komus%C5%8D

religion and funny hats! basket-headed komuso, members of a zen buddhist sect who went from door to door asking people for alms. in exchange, they would offer to bless the homes and rid them of evil spirits.

KIMONO Dress  Meiji Restoration with orange OBI by Shantique

KIMONO Dress Meiji Restoration with orange OBI purple green size-10

Hijikata Toshizo of the Shinsengumi, prototype of Hijikata Toshiro

Hijikata Toshizo~ known as the Demon Vice-Commander (鬼の副長, oni no fukuchou) of the Shinsengumi

Twenty-four Examples of the Meiji Restoration: The Western Umbrella, 1877. Oban.

Toyohara Kunichika Twenty-four Examples of the Meiji Restoration: The Western Umbrella, 1877 bat umbrella

Okubo Toshimichi  [大久保 利通(おおくぼ としみち、文政13年8月10日(1830年9月26日) - 明治11年(1878年)5月14日)は、日本の武士(薩摩藩士)、政治家。位階勲等は贈従一位勲一等。 明治維新の元勲であり、西郷隆盛、木戸孝允と並んで「維新の三傑」と称される。また維新の十傑の1人でもある。その遺族は、華族令当初から侯爵に叙されたが、これは旧大名家、公家以外では、木戸孝允の遺族とともにただ二家のみであった]

Toshimichi Okubo, He was the Japanese Minister of Interior who stopped the blodshed between Kenshin and Saito. Later on he then was killed by Shishio's apprentice, Soujiro Seta. But in the real life, it wasn't the way he died.

The Last Samurais. Taken between 1863 and 1900, the twilight years of the Samurai's reign - #2

The Last Samurai In Rare Photos From 1800s

Hijikata Toshizō (土方 歳三  May 31, 1835 – June 20, 1869) was the vice-commander of Shinsengumi, a great swordsman and a talented Japanese military leader who resisted the Meiji Restoration.  In 1863, he and Kondō Isami formed the Shinsengumi. Kondō and two other men, Serizawa Kamo and Niimi Nishiki, became joint leaders of the group, Shinsengumi served as a special police force in Kyoto that fought against the Reformists under Matsudaira Katamori, the Daimyo of Aizu.

Hijikata Toshizō (土方 歳三 May 1835 – June was the vice-commander of Shinsengumi, a great swordsman and a talented Japanese military leader

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