Coin of Antiochus I Soter, depicting his deified father - Seleucus I Nicator.

Coin of Antiochus I Soter, depicting his deified father - Seleucus I Nicator.

Seleucus I Nicator - When Alexander died in Babylon in 323 BC, his empire was divided among his generals. Seleucus won a large part of it stretching from the Mediterranean through Mesopotamia to the river Indus. His army was exceptionally well organized and had 500 war elephants that played a key role in the battles. He founded many cities: Seleucia, Laodicea, Antioch, Apameia, Zeugma

Silver coin of Seleucus I Nicator, who fought Chandragupta Maurya, and later made an alliance with him.

Seleucus I Nicator - Wikipedia

Seleucus I coin depicting Alexander the Great's horse Bucephalus. Bucephalus means "Ox Head." He could be ridden by no one until Alexander.

Bust of Seleucus I Nicator (Europos ca 358 BC-Lisimacheia 281 BC), Macedonian general after Alexander the Great and founder of the Seleucid dynasty. bronze from the Villa of the Papyri at Herculaneum, Campania, Italy, 1st century BC.

Bust of Seleucus I Nicator (Europos ca 358 BC-Lisimacheia 281 BC), Macedonian general after Alexander the Great and founder of the Seleucid dynasty. bronze from the Villa of the Papyri at Herculaneum, Campania, Italy, century BCE.

Seleucus I Nicator Found in Herculaneum, villa of the papyrii

Seleucus Nicator I. Roman copy from a Greek original, from Herculaneum. Now in the National Archaeological Museum of Naples.

Seleucus I Nicator (305-281 BC). Stater, Ꜹ, 8.51 g, 10 h, uncertain mint 19 in Baktria (Baktra?), 290-281 BC. Head of Apollo right, wearing laurel wreath. / BASILEWS SELEUKOU. Artemis driving biga of elephants right, holding reins in both hands while arming bow with arrow; monogram above [and to right]. Extremely rare, 1 of 6 known (all from one pair of dies), of which 4 are in museums (London, Berlin, and 2 in Miho). Reverse slightly off center. EF.

Seleucus I Nicator (305-281 BC). Stater, Ꜹ, 8.51 g, 10 h, uncertain mint 19 in Baktria (Baktra?), 290-281 BC. Head of Apollo right, wearing laurel wreath. / BASILEWS SELEUKOU. Artemis driving biga of elephants right, holding reins in both hands while arming bow with arrow; monogram above [and to right]. Extremely rare, 1 of 6 known (all from one pair of dies), of which 4 are in museums (London, Berlin, and 2 in Miho). Reverse slightly off center. EF.

Seleucus I Nicator (born in Europos [Kilkis] in c. 358 BC – died in Lysimacheia, Thrace in 281 BC) one of the Diadochi. Having previously served as an infantry general under Alexander the Great, he eventually assumed the title of basileus and established the Seleucid Empire over much of the territory in the Near East which Alexander had conquered. He defeated Antigonus I and Lysimachus in two decisive battles. He founded the cities of Antioch and Seleucia-on-the-Tigris. He was assassinated.

Seleucus I Nicator (born in Europos [Kilkis] in c. 358 BC – died in Lysimacheia, Thrace in 281 BC) one of the Diadochi. Having previously served as an infantry general under Alexander the Great, he eventually assumed the title of basileus and established the Seleucid Empire over much of the territory in the Near East which Alexander had conquered. He defeated Antigonus I and Lysimachus in two decisive battles. He founded the cities of Antioch and Seleucia-on-the-Tigris. He was assassinated.

Obverse depicting Seleucus I Nicator

Obverse depicting Seleucus I Nicator

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