In most cases the Maori shows the true Polynesian hair, black and waved, not the lank straight hair of the American Indian. The frizzled hair sometimes seen is due to the Melanesian admixture. The Maori did not bleach his hair to a reddish hue by the use of lime as did the natives of some northern groups. Baldness was uncommon and excited derision. Men usually extracted hair on the face, as it obscured the close-set lines of tattoo.

Tā moko is the art of facial and body tattooing among the Māori of New Zealand, Portrait of Ngairo Rakai Hikuroa, 1873 byGottfried Lindauer

Ella Verbenne & Yasmin Bidois by David K. Shields for Stil Magazine:  white feathers and snake necklace...

Ella Verbenne & Yasmin Bidois by David K. Shields for Stil Magazine

Ella Verbenne & Yasmin Bidois by David K. Shields for Stil Magazine: white feathers and snake necklace.

Ella Verbenne & Yasmin Bidois by David K. Shields for Stil Magazine:  white feathers and snake necklace...

Ella Verbenne & Yasmin Bidois by David K. Shields for Stil Magazine

Ella Verbenne & Yasmin Bidois by David K. Shields for Stil Magazine: white feathers and snake necklace.

Name/Title	 Kete Muka / Flax Basket Pheasant feathers - (Maniapoto) Primary Maker	Hetet, Rangimarie

Name/Title Kete Muka / Flax Basket Pheasant feathers - (Maniapoto) Primary Maker Hetet, Rangimarie

Object: Kaitaka paepaeroa (cloak with taniko borders and vertical aho, weft…

Object: Kaitaka paepaeroa (cloak with taniko borders and vertical aho, weft rows)

Fiona Collis woven maro

Fiona Collis woven maro

Muka and copper wire with feathers by Fiona Collis part of the Jack Richards collection

Muka and copper wire with feathers by Fiona Collis part of the Jack Richards collection

‘Tui cloak’ by Kōhai Grace

‘Tui cloak’ by Kōhai Grace – Creative life

Medium: muka (New Zealand flax fibre), natural dyes. Size: 7.5 x 6.5 x 1.5 inches (excl. handles). Natural dyes: Tānekaha bark (brown), Raurēkau bark (yellow) "The pattern intricately depicts the subtle ripples—aramoana of the Pacific Ocean. Kete Tāniko makes reference to the processes used to form this delicate basket.

Kete Tāniko by Christina Hurihia Wirihana, Māori artist

Kete - Rāranga | NZ Māori Arts and Crafts

Rare woven baskets known as kete (kit bags) hand-made from Muka (flax fibres) and feathers.

Kahu tōī

Kahu tōī – Māori clothing and adornment – kākahu Māori

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