Te Whiti o Tu - The story of two sisters. Rehutai (mist of the breaking surf) and Tangimoana (the voice of the breaking surf) 2004

This painting by Bronwyn Waipuka illustrates a story by Wairarapa kaumātua…

Te Whiti o Tu - Maori Legend:Te Whiti o Tu - The story from the Wairarapa of two sisters. Rehutai (mist of the breaking surf) and Tangimoana (the voice of the breaking surf). They both fell in love with Rautoroa, a handsome warrior, but he could not decide which to marry. Today a hill is now known as Ōhine-mokemoke – the place of the lonely girl. Write your version of the myth explaining what hapens.

Te Whiti o Tu - Maori Legend - Read the story here…

E HOKI MAI-(the home coming)  The journey of the Maori is seen by many as the return to the land where they came from. The bond to Papatuanuku (mother earth) is strongest for women. Red is the colour of blood and earth - the most sacred colour for Maori people. Women are the most vulnerable and carry the seed of the spirit. Men who have lost the bond to Papatuanuku can regain it in togetherness with women.

E HOKI MAI-(the home coming) The journey of the Maori is seen by many as the…

In Maori traditions(Aotearoa) Taranga, the mother of Māui, stands over her newborn son, who floats on the ocean. Above her the baby lies on his mother's hair. When he was stillborn she set him into the sea wrapped in her tikitiki, a topknot of hair. Māui became known as Māui-tikitiki-a-Taranga. On one side of Taranga Māui, as a kererū, looks down on his father, and on her other side are Māui's brothers. In this tradition, Māui washed ashore and was raised by his grandfather.

In Maori traditions(Aotearoa) Taranga, the mother of Māui, stands over her…

Tawhirimatea- Maori myth: the god of the weather, lighting, thunder, wind, clouds, and storms. He became angry at his brothers for separating their parents so he battled and defeated them except his brother that represented war and humans.

Tawhirimatea- Maori myth: the god of the weather, lighting, thunder, wind…

The tradition originated from the story of the birth of the first earthly Maori woman, Hineahuone, who was made from clay until the Maori god Tāne breathed life into her nostrils. Now, the greeting means "to share breath." By doing so, it is acknowledged that the visitor becomes a member of the local people.

The tradition originated from the story of the birth of the first earthly Maori woman, Hineahuone, who was made from clay until the Maori god Tāne breathed life into her nostrils. Now, the greeting means "to share breath." By doing so, it is acknowledged that the visitor becomes a member of the local people.


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