Pohutakawa, New Zealand

Pohutakawa Tree - if the tree flowers early it's going to be a good summer, if it flowers late, it's not :)

NZ Nikau - Rhopalostylis sapida. The only endemic NZ palm. Very upright growth habit resembles a feather-duster. There is a Nikau Street at New Lynn, West Auckland, NZ.

The only endemic NZ palm. Very upright growth habit resembles a feather-duster. There is a Nikau Street at New Lynn, West Auckland, NZ.

Rātā    The bark of the rātā tree was soaked in water, which was then applied as a lotion.  A poultice of bark was put on sores, wounds and abscesses.  The inner bark was steeped in water and drunk for diarrhoea and dysentery.  Rātā nectar, collected by tapping the flowers against the inside of a calabash, was taken to cure a sore throat.

Rātā The bark of the rātā tree was soaked in water, which was then applied as a lotion. A poultice of bark was put on sores, wounds and abscesses. The inner bark was steeped in water and drunk for diarrhoea and dysentery. Rātā nectar, collected by tapping the flowers against the inside of a calabash, was taken to cure a sore throat.

Kōwhai    The bark of the kōwhai tree was heated in a calabash with hot stones, and made into a poultice for wounds or to rub on a sore back.  A person bitten in the face by a seal had wai kōwhai (kōwhai juice) applied to their wounds, and was well within days.

Kōwhai The bark of the kōwhai tree was heated in a calabash with hot stones, and made into a poultice for wounds or to rub on a sore back. A person bitten in the face by a seal had wai kōwhai (kōwhai juice) applied to their wounds, and was well within days.

Koromiko, Hebe strictaKoromiko is widespread throughout New Zealand. An infusion of the leaves was used as an astringent for dysentery. Poultices were used for ulcers. It was considered good for the kidney and bladder, as well as for diarrhoea and as a tonic.

Koromiko, Hebe strictaKoromiko is widespread throughout New Zealand. An infusion of the leaves was used as an astringent for dysentery. Poultices were used for ulcers. It was considered good for the kidney and bladder, as well as for diarrhoea and as a tonic.

Full size picture of New Zealand Tea Tree, New Zealand Tea Bush, Manuka (Leptospermum scoparium) leptospermum scoparium

View picture of New Zealand Tea Tree, New Must have for Bees (Manuka Honey) NewZealand Tea Bush, Manuka (Leptospermum scoparium) at Dave& Garden.

Rose Pere - Maori Tohunga - Talking With Plants

Rangimarie Turuki Rose Pere, a Maori Tohuna (Wisdom Keeper), relates how the Maori connect and work with plants - even resistant ones. The Maori, native .

Kumarahou in flower

Pomaderris kumeraho Kumarahou Kumarohou is a plant of poor soils and is found from North Cape to Kawhia and the Bay of Plenty. Kumarahou makes lather if the leaves and flowers are crushed and stirred in a bowl of water.

New Zealand spinach keeps on growing and seems to be unaffected by the bugs and problems that affect other greens. This is a very robust plant that even can handle saline soils, drought, bugs, salt and poor soil. And it does much better in heat than true spinach.

A new favorite perennial food plant - New Zealand Spinach. Tolerates drought and poor soil.

Traditionally, Māori considered the harakeke plant to have medicinal properties and used it, for example, to treat wounds. One of the ingredients in Moana's skincare products is Harakeke extract (New Zealand flax), a nectar which offers far more anti-inflammatory and hydration than Aloe Vera

We call it 'flax' but it's actually a lily - one of New Zealand's oldest plant species

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