Matariki – Māori New Year 2016

Matariki – Māori New Year 2016

Maori Tattoos, Koru Tattoo, Maori Tattoo Designs, Star Mobile, Maori Art, Year 2016, New Years 2016, Small Tattoos, Nail Ideas

Types of tukutuku designs – Māori weaving and tukutuku – te raranga me te whatu – Te Ara Encyclopedia of New Zealand

Types of tukutuku designs – Māori weaving and tukutuku – te raranga me te whatu…

The simplest canoes were dugouts, made by hollowing out a log. Other canoes can be made by joining planks together and waterproofing them. They made sails by weaving together coconut or pine leaves. For longer trips, they used large double-hulled canoes. They had large ones that were 30m long and could carry up to 300 people. To travel futher, large canoes could carry less people and more supplies.

The simplest canoes were dugouts, made by hollowing out a log. Other canoes can be made by joining planks together and waterproofing them. They made sails by weaving together coconut or pine leaves. For longer trips, they used large double-hulled canoes. They had large ones that were 30m long and could carry up to 300 people. To travel futher, large canoes could carry less people and more supplies.

Weaving tāniko, around 1910

Weaving tāniko, around 1910 – Te raranga me te whatu

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Adele Jackson These are Maori weaving patterns called Taniko for incorporating into flax skirts called piu piu, and into the woven panels of Maori meeting houses in New Zealand.

Waka (Maori canoe)

Sello: Waka (Maori canoe) (Nueva Zelanda) (Great Voyages of New Zealand) Mi:NZ 3391

Whitikaupeka  Wharenui,  Moawhango, New Zealand

Whitikaupeka Wharenui, Moawhango, New Zealand

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Journal of the Polynesian Society: The Evolution Of Maori Clothing. Part IX, By Te Rangi Hiroa (P. Buck) P

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