This turapa (tukutuku) pattern, called Te Ara, is unique to Te Arawa. It symbolises the voyage of the canoe Te Arawa from Taputapuatea to Maketū 26 generations ago.

This turapa (tukutuku) pattern, called Te Ara, is unique to Te Arawa. It symbolises the voyage of the canoe Te Arawa from Taputapuatea to Maketū 26 generations ago.

INTERWEAVING NARRATIVES: MAORI TUKUTUKU PANEL

Geometric Design in Weaving By Regensteiner, Else i've said that for many posts, but really it does.

Image of Taonga Whakairo. This taonga is in three sections. These are a centre panel of tukutuku, flanked by two poupou. The work is rich in symbolism as it depicts the main gods of the Māori pantheon that are associated with our work. The work is also a symbol of LINZ's historic past and of its core business today, of being the kaitiaki (guardian) and interpreter of land information, for New Zealand.

Taonga Whakairo (carved treasure) by tohunga whakairo (master carver) Rangi Hetet in the Wellington, New Zealand national office of LINZ (Land Information New Zealand). Two of his daughters weaved the tukutuku (lattice work) in the center of the artwork.

Image of Taonga Whakairo. This taonga is in three sections. These are a centre panel of tukutuku, flanked by two poupou. The work is rich in symbolism as it depicts the main gods of the Māori pantheon that are associated with our work. The work is also a symbol of LINZ's historic past and of its core business today, of being the kaitiaki (guardian) and interpreter of land information, for New Zealand.

Taonga Whakairo (carved treasure) by tohunga whakairo (master carver) Rangi Hetet in the Wellington, New Zealand national office of LINZ (Land Information New Zealand). Two of his daughters weaved the tukutuku (lattice work) in the center of the artwork.

Image of Taonga Whakairo. This taonga is in three sections. These are a centre panel of tukutuku, flanked by two poupou. The work is rich in symbolism as it depicts the main gods of the Māori pantheon that are associated with our work. The work is also a symbol of LINZ's historic past and of its core business today, of being the kaitiaki (guardian) and interpreter of land information, for New Zealand.

Taonga Whakairo (carved treasure) by tohunga whakairo (master carver) Rangi Hetet in the Wellington, New Zealand national office of LINZ (Land Information New Zealand). Two of his daughters weaved the tukutuku (lattice work) in the center of the artwork.


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