Kirsty Bruce

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Kirsty Bruce
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The Dunstable Swan. Found in a dig in Dunstable, Beds., dates from around 1400. Swans were used often as family devices to relate that family to a Swan Knight of legend, who floated on a river in a boat drawn by swans, to rescue a lady in distress. The most prominent family to use it were the de Bohuns - Henry IV's first wife was Mary de Bohun & apparently the swan became also a Lancastrian symbol after this marriage.

Medieval, around AD 1400 From France or England The Dunstable Swan Jewel is a livery badge. To wear such an item was a declaration of allegiance to a noble family or a king.

The Dunstable Swan livery badge from the British Museum.  Henry IV is known to have had one very similar, which he paid to have  mended.  The swan was one of the livery symbols of his wife, Mary de Bohun.  This has such charm.

The Dunstable Swan livery badge from the British Museum. Henry IV is known to have had one very similar, which he paid to have mended. The swan was one of the livery symbols of his wife, Mary de Bohun.

Elizabeth Woodville Cosmo, seen on Susan Higginbotham's blog. After marrying the king of England for love she was hated for her family becoming too powerful. Her sons were the famous princes in the tower

Elizabeth Woodville on the Cover of a medieval edition of the Cosmopolitan.

THE MARRIAGE OF ELIZABETH WOODVILLE &  EDWARD IV

John grey and Elizabeth Woodville. John Grey was Elizabeth Woodville's first husband, prior to her marriage to Edward IV, she is known as the White Queen

A close-up of the tomb effigy of Elizabeth of York; photo taken from a Westminster Abbey souvenir booklet.

Queen consort of England (Elizabeth of York) married to Henry VII King of England (Reign: Aug. Elizabeth of York's effigy on her tomb,

Lady Elizabeth Woodville Pleading for Her Children before Edward IV  By John Opie  Date Painted: 1798  From: Winchester City Council Museums  Elizabeth was left a widow aged 23, after her first husband the Lancastrian Sir John Grey of Groby was killed in battle.     Elizabeth's late husband's lands were confiscated, and she was forced to petition her ‘enemy’, the new Yorkist King Edward IV, on behalf of her two sons.

Lady Elizabeth Woodville Pleading for Her Children before Edward IV by John Opie A romantic picture of Lady Elizabeth Woodville on her knees pleading for her two sons before King Edward.

Edward IV and Elizabeth Woodville from the Luton Guild Book

The Luton Guild Book. Frontspiece, circa Edward IV and Elizabeth Wydville, kneeling before Bishop Thomas Rotherham and the Trinity. Anne Neville is possibly the woman in the blue dress on the far right.

Elizabeth Woodville and her children; stained-glass window at Little Malvern Priory

the family of Edward IV and Elizabeth Woodville, depicted in stainglass of the Little Malvern Priory Church.

Queen Elizabeth Woodville with daughters Anne, Catherine and Bridget Stained Glass Window Canterbury Cathedral North transept

Queen Elizabeth Woodville with daughters Anne, Catherine and Bridget Stained Glass Window Canterbury Cathedral North transept