Taniko

Collection by Michelle Leef

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Adele Jackson These are Maori weaving patterns called Taniko for incorporating into flax skirts called piu piu, and into the woven panels of Maori meeting houses in New Zealand.

Fig. 88. Some weaving patterns. — a-d, triangle motifs on side borders; e-k, triangle, lozenge, "hour glass," and zigzag motifs on lower borders | NZETC

marque page

marque page

To show respect to the Tangata Whenua I learnt from them the skill of Korowai weaving. I am very grateful to my tutors and fellow weavers at the Papakura Marae for their help and inspiration

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Kura Gallery Aotearoa Art + Design – we exhibit and sell an extensive range of original quality Maori and New Zealand made art and design that is unique to Aotearoa. Established in 1998 Kura has artspaces in both Auckland and Wellington and represents established and emerging Maori and New Zealand artists.

Te Korowai by Wiremu Hohaia, via Flickr

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Three Phormium fibre cloaks with taniko borders and one feather cape. H. Hamilton photo, only wish it was in colour.

Three Phormium fibre cloaks with taniko borders and one feather cape. — H. Hamilton photo | NZETC

Kaitaka cloaks with tāniko borders

Kaitaka cloaks with tāniko borders

Click on these kaitaka – cloaks with a tāniko border – to see a full image and extra information about each. These cloaks date to the early 19th century and are all held at the British Museum.

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taniko patterns and meanings

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Tāniko designs

Kaitaka cloaks with tāniko borders

Click on these kaitaka – cloaks with a tāniko border – to see a full image and extra information about each. These cloaks date to the early 19th century and are all held at the British Museum.

Tāniko designs

Kaitaka cloaks with tāniko borders

Click on these kaitaka – cloaks with a tāniko border – to see a full image and extra information about each. These cloaks date to the early 19th century and are all held at the British Museum.