This stunning book presents a photographic survey that traverses the concepts and values of traditional Maori weaving through to innovative, contemporary weaving practice. The evocative photos and text reveal the spiritual significance of weaving within Maori culture.  http://ils.stdc.govt.nz/cgi-bin/koha/opac-detail.pl?biblionumber=1288&query_desc=

The Art of Maori Weaving: the Eternal Thread, Te aho mutunga kore

Journalist and historian Dick Scott broke new ground with ASK THAT MOUNTAIN. The book draws on official papers, settler manuscripts and oral histories to give the first complete account of what took place at Parihaka, the small settlement at the foot of Mount Taranaki where the chiefs Te Whiti and Tohu opposed the colonial government in the latter half of the nineteenth centur. http://ils.stdc.govt.nz/cgi-bin/koha/opac-detail.pl?biblionumber=3276&query_desc=

Another must read for all NZ'ers - for a serious lesson on aspects of our history

The Treaty of Waitangi struck a bargain between two parties: the Crown and Māori. Its promises of security, however, were followed from 1845 to 1872 by a series of volatile and bloody conflicts commonly known as the New Zealand Wars. http://ils.stdc.govt.nz/cgi-bin/koha/opac-detail.pl?biblionumber=146314

Kupapa : the Bitter Legacy of Maori Alliances with the Crown

http://ils.stdc.govt.nz/cgi-bin/koha/opac-detail.pl?biblionumber=176&query_desc=

http://ils.stdc.govt.nz/cgi-bin/koha/opac-detail.pl?biblionumber=176&query_desc=

'Us Maoris used to practice slavery just like them poor Negroes had to endure in America . . .' says Beth Heke in Once Were Warriors . 'Oh those evil colonials who destroyed Maori culture by ending slavery and cannibalism while increasing the life expectancy,' wrote one sarcastic blogger. http://ils.stdc.govt.nz/cgi-bin/koha/opac-detail.pl?biblionumber=153356

Outcasts of the Gods?: The Struggle over Slavery in Maori New Zealand

In recent decades, New Zealand Maori have made huge efforts to reinvigorate their language ( te reo ) and the life of tribal meeting places ( marae ) as the twin cornerstones of Maori identity. Maori television and radio stations have been set up, a Maori Language Commission established, and language emersion early childcare centers ( kohanga reo ), schools ( kura kaupapa ), and universities ( wananga ) have emerged.  http://ils.stdc.govt.nz/cgi-bin/koha/opac-detail.pl?biblionumber=135353

Focusing on Tai Tokerau as a case study, Maranga Mai! asks what is the future for Māori culture?

Native identity is usually associated with a particular place. But what if that place is the ocean? Once Were Pacific explores this question as it considers how Māori and other Pacific peoples frame their connection to the ocean, to New Zealand, and to each other through various creative works.

Once Were Pacific: Maori Connections to Oceania by Alice Te Punga Somerville - C 522 TEP

Woman Far Walking is about a woman who, in the Year 2000, is 160 years old. People know her as Tiri Mahana but her real Maori name is Tiriti o Waitangi Mahana and she was born on 6 February 1840. The outer structure of Woman Far Walking is provided by Tiri Mahana's 160th birthday party. The inner structure of the play takes place inside Tiri's memory and her dream world. http://ils.stdc.govt.nz/cgi-bin/koha/opac-detail.pl?biblionumber=30831&query_desc=kw%2Cwrdl%3A%20witi%20ihimaera

Woman Far Walking is about a woman who, in the Year 2000, is 160 years old. People know her as Tiri Mahana but her real Maori name is Tiriti o Waitangi Mahana and she was born on 6 February 1840. The outer structure of Woman Far Walking is provided by Tiri Mahana's 160th birthday party. The inner structure of the play takes place inside Tiri's memory and her dream world. http://ils.stdc.govt.nz/cgi-bin/koha/opac-detail.pl?biblionumber=30831&query_desc=kw%2Cwrdl%3A%20witi%20ihimaera


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