Hiapo: Past and Present in Niuean Barkcloth by Nicholas Thomas. Tapa, or barkcloth, is called 'hiapo' in the language of Niue Island in central Polynesia. The painted hiapo of Niue is a remarkable art that until now has been obscure to all but a few specialists. Hiapo have distinct cultural patterns.

Hiapo: Past and Present in Niuean Barkcloth by Nicholas Thomas. Tapa, or barkcloth, is called 'hiapo' in the language of Niue Island in central Polynesia. The painted hiapo of Niue is a remarkable art that until now has been obscure to all but a few specialists. Hiapo have distinct cultural patterns.

Matavai Resort in Niue provides a complete resort getaway for families, groups and couples.

Matavai Resort in Niue provides a complete resort getaway for families, groups and couples.

A Niuean dance group performs a traditional Polynesian dance to welcome tourists.

A Niuean dance group performs a traditional Polynesian dance to welcome tourists.

Niuean food -Food Division for Ear Piercing [Ceremony], Alofi, Niue, 1982/2004 Photo by Josef Lebovic

Niuean food -Food Division for Ear Piercing [Ceremony], Alofi, Niue, Photo by Josef Lebovic

Little Niuean Girl with Drum

Little Niuean Girl with Drum

Takihi is a delicious Niuean dish with  taro and pawpaw layered and baked with coconut cream  - NIUE

Takihi is a delicious Niuean dish with taro and pawpaw layered and baked with coconut cream - NIUE

Niuean tattoo

Niuean tattoo

Topic: Niuean war stones | Collections Online - Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

Access information on more than objects in Te Papa's collections. Get up close to our collections through collected specimens and thousands of zoomable images.

A Niuean group performing a Niuean War Dance on the Niuean Stage at the Polyfest, The Manukau Sports Bowl, South Auckland - 2005.

A Niuean group performing a Niuean War Dance on the Niuean Stage at the Polyfest, The Manukau Sports Bowl, South Auckland -

Niuean (ko e vagahau Niuē) is a Polynesian language spoken by about 8,000 people, the majority of whom live in New Zealand. There are also Niuean speakers in Niue, where almost the entire population of about 2,000 speak the language, the Cook Islands and Tonga. The closest relative of Niuean is Tongan, while Maori, Samoan, and Hawaiian are also quite close. Niuean was first written by Christian missionaries in the mid 19th century using a spelling system influenced by Samoan. (...)

Niuean is a Polynesian language spoken in Niue, the Cook Islands, New Zealand and Tonga by about people.

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