Seaweek 2015

The theme for Seaweek this year is “Look beneath the surface – Papatai ō roto – Papatai ō raro” highlighting how precious this amazing resource is that we call the sea and how much we can learn from studying its wonders. For more information see http://seaweek.org.nz/
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Marine Metre Squared - citizen science for Seaweek

students are being encouraged to participate in Marine Metre Squared, a citizen science project being run by the NZ Marine Studies Centre, Otago University. Programme runs throughout

TEACHING RESOURCES: Life in the Sea -  Exploring New Zealand’s marine environments

Life in the Sea - Exploring New Zealand’s marine environments - NZ scientists use a range of methods to learn about life in the sea around us. How do our marine organisms interact, and how do we affect them?

STUDENT ACTIVITY: Build a marine food web - In this activity, students build their own food web using images of organisms from the marine ecosystem. This activity can be done indoors on paper or outdoors on a tarmac surface using chalk.

INFO SHEET - Marine food webs - Feeding relationships are often shown as simple food chains – in reality, these relationships are much more complex, and the term ‘food web’ more accurately shows the links between producers, consumers and decomposers.

Marine Reserves – Science Express

Marine Reserves – Science Express

TEACHING RESOURCES: The Noisy Reef - Learning how underwater animals use sound in their world.

CONTEXT - The Noisy Reef - Learning how underwater animals use sound in their world - Travel under the waves to the reefs of New Zealand to explore sound and noise – what sound is, how it travels, what changes under water and how animals use it.

TEACHING RESOURCES: Toxins - with links to the marine environment

Toxins: Delving into the world of poisons. Learn how New Zealand’s most poisonous creature was discovered through the investigative work of scientists. Discover what toxins are, how they are identified and how they enter the food web.

Where Land Meets Sea (including the Rena disaster in NZ)

SCIENCE STORY: Where Land Meets Sea - New Zealand is surrounded by sea. Our coastlines and marine resources need care and protection. The Coastal Marine Group focuses on the Bay of Plenty – with a particular emphasis on the Rena shipwreck disaster.

NZ SCIENCE RESEARCH: Understanding food webs in Fiordland

Research into food webs has come a long way in the past 50 years. The view of simple linear food chains where small fish are eaten by bigger fish has been replaced by a much better understanding of the complexity of food webs.

STUDENT ACTIVITY: Develop a classification system | Sciencelearn Hub

In this activity, students work in small groups and come up with their own classification system for a number of marine organisms.

INTERACTIVE: Sea stars have many weird and wonderful adaptations. Click on any of the labels to view short video clips or images to learn more. Don’t forget to flip the sea star over and see what’s underneath!

Sea stars have many weird and wonderful adaptations. Don’t forget to flip the sea star over and see what’s underneath!

INTERACTIVE: Explore this interactive diagram to learn more about life in the sea. Click on the different labels to view short video clips or images about different parts of the marine ecosystem.

FOOD WEBS-Feeding relationships are often shown as simple food chains – in reality, these relationships are much more complex, and the term ‘food web’ more accurately shows the links between producers, consumers and decomposers

INFO SHEET: Find out more about the animals and plants that are at home on New Zealand reefs and the different areas or zones of the reef.

Global warming: Otters, kelp and Here’s how it works: Otters control sea urchin populations. Sea urchins eat kelp, and fast-growing kelp is very efficient at absorbing

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