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Trahlyta Cherokee Indian Princess Gravesite Plaque.  Trahlyta Gravesite, Dahlonega, Georgia.  Read more......

Trahlyta Cherokee Indian Princess Gravesite Plaque. Trahlyta Gravesite, Dahlonega, Georgia. Read more......

This log structure is an original Cherokee tavern that was built by James Vann, a wealthy Cherokee merchant and plantation owner. This and several other northwest Georgia taverns served travelers along the Federal Road, which was the main route through the area until the coming of the railroad in the early 1850s.  Photo Courtesy of Georgia Department of Natural Resources

This log structure is an original Cherokee tavern that was built by James Vann, a wealthy Cherokee merchant and plantation owner. This and several other northwest Georgia taverns served travelers along the Federal Road, which was the main route through the area until the coming of the railroad in the early 1850s. Photo Courtesy of Georgia Department of Natural Resources

A very special feature at the Northeast Georgia History Center is the 18th century cabin of Cherokee Indian Chief White Path. The cabin was built c. 1780 near the site of present day Ellijay, Georgia by White Path’s parents.

My Great Grandfather Nunna-tsune-ga translated to Chief White Path was the Chief in the Cherokee Indian tribe.(Re: Joshua Reeder)

During the 1800's, the Cherokee Indians lived in hand crafted log buildings and farmed the land.  The capital of the Cherokee Nation was located in New Echhota in the North Georgia Mountains. They lived in peace until the Trail of Tears when they were relocated to Oklahoma in 1831. A sad time in American History. You will see these farmstead bui...

During the the Cherokee Indians lived in hand crafted log buildings and farmed the land. The capital of the Cherokee Nation was located in New Echhota in the North Georgia Mountains. They lived in peace until the Trail of Tears when they were rel

Forgotten Oklahoma cemetery contains grave of woman who walked Trail of Tears - Electa Crittenden - Dec. 25, 1835 and died Jan. 20, 1879. At the base of her tombstone is a bronze plaque engraved with the words “In honor of one who endured the forced removal of the Cherokees in 1838-1839.”    Read more: http://newsok.com/forgotten-oklahoma-cemetery-contains-grave-of-woman-who-walked-trail-of-tears/article/3673050#ixzz1u9t80B9D

Forgotten Oklahoma cemetery contains grave of woman who walked Trail of Tears

On Saturday about 60 members of the Trail of Tears — Oklahoma Chapter honored Electa Crittenden. At the base of her tombstone is a bronze plaque engraved with the words “In honor of one who endured the forced removal of the Cherokees in

Chief Vann house, Chatsworth GA, Home of James Vann, built in 1804. Vann was one of the wealthiest Cherokee in the early nineteenth century. Vann was bannished from this home as a result of the Indian Removal Act but was "compensated 26,979.25 for his losses.

Chief Vann house, Chatsworth GA, Home of James Vann, built in Vann was one of the wealthiest Cherokee in the early nineteenth century. Vann was bannished from this home as a result of the Indian Removal Act but was compensated for his losses.

When Andrew Jackson signed the Indian Removal Act he forced the Cherokee to move and about one fourth of them died on the journey this journey became known as the Trail of Tears. The trail of tears was to move from Georgia (in this case) to Oklahoma.  It was not the name of the trail until many Indians died. They died due to exposure to cold weather, starvation, and diseases. They had to travel 1,000 miles on the journey.

Cherokee Indian Legends: Cherokee Indian legends including creation stories, how the rabbit got a short tail, the bear legend, and the eagle's revenge.

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