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Springheel Jack

Illustration of Spring-heeled Jack, from the serial Spring-heel'd Jack: The Terror of London

Dave Laub

"Spring Heeled Jack" by Dave Laub. 'Spring-Heeled Jack' is one of England's most feared and oldest legends. He resembles a demon and steals children and got his name because of his huge leaps. Reports said that he could jump clear over houses.

Spring-heeled Jack is an entity in English folklore of the Victorian era who was known for his startling hops. The first claimed sighting of Spring-heeled Jack was in 1837.Later sightings were reported all over Great Britain and were especially prevalent in suburban London, the Midlands and Scotland. Jack was described by people who claimed to have seen him as having a terrifying and frightful appearance, with diabolical physiognomy, clawed hands, and eyes that "resembled red balls of fire"

Spring-heeled Jack is an entity in English folklore of the Victorian era who was…

Spring-Heeled Jack in London

"Spring Heeled Jack": Spring-Heeled Jack is part of British folklore. He resembles a demon and steals children and got his name because of his huge leaps. Reports said that he could jump clear over houses.

Found in the Collection: Spring-Heeled Jack! | Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum Blog

“Spring-Heeled Jack” No. 19 & From The San Francisco Academy of Comic Art, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum

Spring-heeled Jack was last seen in 1904 at Everton in Liverpool.

Victorian Era Folklore Spring-Heeled Jack, a character of folklore that terrorized England in the early

The Terror of London

Spring-Heeled Jack The First Masked Mystery Man. Spring-Heeled Jack, The First Masked Mstery Man. For the uninitiated Spring-Heeled Jack is a legendary figure from Victorian British folklore who bo…

It is easy to forget that in the Victorian age of strict family values, well-ordered hierarchical society and straight-laced sensibilities that a sub-culture existed that popularised fairies, seanc...

It is easy to forget that in the Victorian age of strict family values, well-ordered hierarchical society and straight-laced sensibilities that a sub-culture existed that popularised fairies, seanc.

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