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Lincoln's Plan & A Diff. Of Opinions: Radical Republicans (today's "liberal" democrats), a small, but loud group of Republicans, disagreed with Lincoln’s plan. They wanted to punish the South, so they proposed that: 50% of Southerners take loyalty oath Former Confederate leaders be stripped of any political power Former slaves be granted full civil rights Lincoln killed the proposed plan with a pocket veto.

Lincoln's Plan & A Diff. Of Opinions: Radical Republicans (today's "liberal" democrats), a small, but loud group of Republicans, disagreed with Lincoln’s plan. They wanted to punish the South, so they proposed that: 50% of Southerners take loyalty oath Former Confederate leaders be stripped of any political power Former slaves be granted full civil rights Lincoln killed the proposed plan with a pocket veto.

Oct. 16, 1859. Abolitionist John Brown leads a group of 20 men in a raid on Harper's Ferry.

John Brown abolitionist who advocated armed rebellion by slaves. He slaughtered pro-slavery settlers in Kansas and in 1859 was hanged by Virginia for leading an unsuccessful slave insurrection at Harpers Ferry.

Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture.

Corpus christi history essay format Sample essay for college scholarships. Richard vella and helen english.

Slave ships, large cargo ships specially converted for the purpose of transporting slaves, especially newly purchased African slaves to the Americas. As many as 20 million Africans were transported by ship. The transportation of slaves from Africa to America was known as the Middle Passage.-Spirits of the Passage

Slave ships, large cargo ships specially converted for the purpose of transporting slaves to the Americas. Transportation of slaves from Africa to America was known as the Middle Passage.

The Orangeburg massacre is the most common name given to an incident on February 8, 1968, in which nine South Carolina Highway Patrol officers in Orangeburg, South Carolina, fired into a crowd of protesters demonstrating against segregation at a bowling alley near the campus of South Carolina State College, a historically black college. Three men were killed and twenty-eight persons were injured; most victims were shot in the back. ~ additional comment from Colleen Griffin re: comment…

Why America needs to reject the Charleston massacre’s dangerous narrative of forgiveness

The Orangeburg massacre is the most common name given to an incident on February 8, 1968, in which nine South Carolina Highway Patrol officers in Orangeburg, South Carolina, fired into a crowd of protesters demonstrating against segregation at a bowling alley near the campus of South Carolina State College, a historically black college. Three men were killed and twenty-eight persons were injured; most victims were shot in the back. ~ additional comment from Colleen Griffin re: comment…

US Slave: Civil War Humanitarian Crisis

Early Life - America - American History - Women's Rights - Child Labor - The Great Depression - Civil Rights - Native Americans - Slavery - American Indians.

THE COLORED MAGAZINE The Colored American was a name used by two 19th-century weekly African-Americannewspapers: one that was published in New York City from 1836 to 1842 by Samuel Cornish, Phillip Bell, and Charles Bennett Ray, and one that was published in Washington, D.C., from 1893 to 1904. by Edward Elder Cooper

This was one of the first monthly magazines created for the national African American consumer. Published and circulated in Boston, Mass. and New York City until the Colored American Magazine did for nine years in the what Ebony Magazine is doing today.

ca. 1880’s,  Mary Walker wearing her medal of honor. Only woman to receive a Congressional Medal of Honor in the Civil War.

[cabinet card of Mary Walker wearing her medal of honor], Collins Studio “ “An 1855 graduate of Syracuse Medical College, Mary Walker was an author and early feminist who gained distinction during the Civil War as a humanitarian, surgeon.

Maj. General William Tecumseh Sherman (February 8, 1820 – February 14, 1891) He served as a General in the Union Army during the American Civil War (1861–65), for which he received recognition for his outstanding command of military strategy as well as criticism for the harshness of the "scorched earth" policies that he implemented in conducting total war against the Confederate States.

William Tecumseh Sherman burned a swath 80 miles wide as his army marched through Georgia, decimating the state. The Civil War would be more aptly referred to as the War of Northern Aggression.

In 1793, Eli Whitney invented the cotton gin, causing the need for more slaves to work in the fields to be able to keep up with the machines. Cotton quickly became the top crop in Georgia, which the state's economy depended on.

In Eli Whitney invented the cotton gin, causing the need for more slaves to work in the fields to be able to keep up with the machines. Cotton quickly became the top crop in Georgia, which the state's economy depended on.

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The Secret Science Ancients Knew, Time Erased, Now Returned – But Greater, “Truly the light is sweet & a pleasant thing it is for the eyes to behold the sun,” Ecclesiastes 11:7

The Secret Science Ancients Knew, Time Erased, Now Returned – But Greater, “Truly the light is sweet & a pleasant thing it is for the eyes to behold the sun,” Ecclesiastes

A rare photograph of a group of women sitting on piles of cotton with two white male overseers. Entitled "Freedom on the Plantation" circa 1863-1866. Robin Stanford Collection, DeGolyer Library, Southern Methodist University.

A post-war South Carolina scene at a cotton gin at the Knox Plantation. (Robin Stanford Collection/Courtesy of Library of Congress)

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