"The Name on the Door is Not Mine", by C.K. Stead.  2017 Finalist - Acorn Foundation Fiction Prize.  Gathered from throughout Karl Stead's career, this collection is a reminder of his deft storytelling and literary power...These stories, linked by tone and feel, are clever, sensual, wry and beautifully written, with Stead's subtle sense of humour evident at every turn.

"The Name on the Door is Not Mine", by C.K. Stead. 2017 Finalist - Acorn Foundation Fiction Prize. Gathered from throughout Karl Stead's career, this collection is a reminder of his deft storytelling and literary power...These stories, linked by tone and feel, are clever, sensual, wry and beautifully written, with Stead's subtle sense of humour evident at every turn.

"A history of New Zealand women", by Barbara Brookes - 2017 Winner Illustrated Non-Fiction. A comprehensive history of New Zealand seen through a female lens. Brookes argues that while European men erected the political scaffolding to create a small nation, women created the infrastructure necessary for colonial society to succeed. Concepts of home, marriage and family brought by settler women, and integral to the developing state, transformed the lives of Māori women.

In her long-awaited book, Barbara Brookes, drawing on a wide variety of sources, traces the narratives of women’s lives throughout New Zealand's history.

"Molesworth : stories from New Zealand's largest high-country station", byHarry Broad ; photographs by Rob Suisted -this book is a history of Molesworth  highcountry station. . It tells the stories of those who have contributed so much over the years to this highly successful station. Just as importantly, it explains the importance of recreation and conservation in the running of a modern high-country farm. Richly illustrated. 2014 Nielsen Bookseller's Choice Winner

Giveaway: Molesworth—Stories from New Zealand’s Largest High-Country Station

"Peter McLeavey : the life and times of a New Zealand art dealer", by Jill Trevelyan - a biography of  Wellington art dealer, Peter McLeavey. It charts the development of contemporary art in New Zealand. The research is based on McLeavey's extensive archive, exhibition files and letters to and from artists around New Zealand. 2014 General Non-Fiction Winner and Book of the Year,

Hugely influential in the New Zealand art world. This biograp[hy of iconic Wellingtonian Peter McLeavey, 'the life and times of a New Zealand art dealer' is well worth a read. See it in our library's catalogue.

"Māori boy : a memoir of childhood", by Witi Ihimaera - .This is the first volume of Witi Ihimaera's enthralling memoir, packed with stories of the formative years of this much-loved writer. 2016 General Non-Fiction Winner

"Māori boy : a memoir of childhood", by Witi Ihimaera - .This is the first volume of Witi Ihimaera's enthralling memoir, packed with stories of the formative years of this much-loved writer. 2016 General Non-Fiction Winner

"A whakapapa of tradition : 100 years of Ngāti Porou carving, 1830-1930 / Ngarino Ellis with new photography by Natalie Robertson - 2017 Winner - Judith Binney First Book, Illustrated Non Fiction. The story of Ngāti Porou carving and a profound transformation in Māori art.

A Whakapapa of Tradition by Ngarino Ellis - Books - Auckland University Press

"Black ice matter", by Gina Cole - 2017 Winner Hubert Church Best First Book Fiction - A collection of short stories exploring the connections between extremes of heat and cold. Sometimes this is spatial or geographical; sometimes it is metaphorical.

"Black ice matter", by Gina Cole - 2017 Winner Hubert Church Best First Book Fiction - A collection of short stories exploring the connections between extremes of heat and cold. Sometimes this is spatial or geographical; sometimes it is metaphorical.

"Can You Tolerate This?" by Ashleigh Young.  2017 Winner - Royal Society Te Apārangi Award for General Non-Fiction.  Also, winner of a Windham-Campbell Prize at Yale University.  A collection of twenty-one personal essays.

"Can You Tolerate This?" by Ashleigh Young. 2017 Winner - Royal Society Te Apārangi Award for General Non-Fiction. Also, winner of a Windham-Campbell Prize at Yale University. A collection of twenty-one personal essays.

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