"Introducing the Ancient Greeks", by Edith Hall - Who were the ancient Greeks? They gave us democracy, philosophy, poetry, rational science, the joke. But what was it about them that enabled them to achieve such titanic leaps forwards in civilization? This introduction unveils a civilization and a people of astounding complexity.

Who were the ancient Greeks? They gave us democracy, philosophy, poetry, rational science, the joke. But what was it that enabled them to achieve so much? The ancient Greeks were a geographically disparate people whose civilization lasted over twenty cent

"The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks" by Rebecca Skloot  - Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor Southern tobacco farmer, yet her cells-taken without her knowledge-became one of the most important tools in medicine'. A compelling read. Mixture of social history, human scientific endeavour and family memoir.

Booktopia has The Immortal Life Of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot. Buy a discounted Paperback of The Immortal Life Of Henrietta Lacks online from Australia's leading online bookstore.

"The Invention of Nature: the adventures of Alexander von Humboldt", by Andrea Wulf - Alexander was an intrepid explorer, his restless life packed with adventure and discovery. Wulf shows how Humboldt created our understanding of the natural world, and champions a renewed interest in this vital player in environmental history and science.

"The Invention of Nature: the adventures of Alexander von Humboldt", by Andrea Wulf - Alexander was an intrepid explorer, his restless life packed with adventure and discovery. Wulf shows how Humboldt created our understanding of the natural world, and champions a renewed interest in this vital player in environmental history and science.

"I contain multitudes : the microbes within us and a grander view of life", by Ed Yong - Every animal, whether human, squid, or wasp, is home to millions of bacteria and other microbes. Many people think of microbes as germs to be eradicated, but those that live with us—the microbiome—build our bodies, protect our health, shape our identities, and grant us incredible abilities. In this astonishing book, Ed Yong takes us on a grand tour through our microbial partners.

I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life Joining the ranks of popular science classics like The Botany of Desire and The Selfish Gene.

"We are all stardust : scientists who shaped our world talk about their work, their lives, and what they still want to know", by Stefan Klein - In this collection of intimate conversations with 19 of the world’s best-known scientists, Stefan Klein lets us listen in as today’s leading minds reveal what they still hope to discover — and how their paradigm-changing work entwines with their lives outside the lab.

The winners of the Australian Book Design Awards will be announced on Friday 13 May.

"Lab girl: a story of trees, science and love", by Hope Jahren - Acclaimed scientist Hope Jahren has built three laboratories in which she’s studied trees, flowers, seeds, and soil.  Jahren's descriptions of her work, her intense relationship with the plants, seeds and soil she studies, and her insights on nature enliven every page of this thrilling book.

(Adult) In this engaging and passionate memoir, Hope Jahren chronicles her love affair with science and plants, living with mental illness, and her twenty year friendship with her research assistant, a somewhat strange one-handed man named Bill.

"The boy who played with fusion : extreme science, extreme parenting, and how to make a star", by Tom Clynes - By the age of 11, Taylor Wilson had mastered the science of rocket propulsion. At 13, his grandmother's cancer diagnosis drove him to investigate medical uses for radioactive isotopes. And at 14, Wilson became the youngest person in history to achieve nuclear fusion.

The boy who played with fusion: extreme science, extreme parenting and how to make a star 24 February 2016 Tom Clynes Faber & Faber 2015

"The Radioactive Boy Scout: the frightening true story of a whiz kid and his homemade nuclear reactor", by Ken Silverstein - David Hahn was fascinated by science. While working on his Atomic Energy badge for the Boy Scouts, David's obsessive attention turned to nuclear energy. Throwing caution to the wind, he plunged into a new project: building a nuclear breeder reactor in his backyard garden shed.

The Radioactive Boy Scout: The Frightening True Story of a Whiz Kid and His Homemade Nuclear Reactor by Ken Silverstein. It's a great summer read for science geeks!

"An Atlas of Countries That Don't Exist: a compendium of fifty unrecognized and largely unnoticed states", by Nick Middleton - Acclaimed travel writer and Oxford geography don Nick Middleton takes us on a magical tour of countries that, lacking diplomatic recognition or UN membership, inhabit a world of shifting borders, visionary leaders and forgotten peoples.

An Atlas Of Countries That Don’T Exist: A Compendium Of Fifty Unrecognized And Largely Unnoticed States PDF - books library land

"Salt: a world history", by Mark Kurlansky - Homer called it a divine substance. Plato described it as especially dear to the gods. As Mark Kurlansky so brilliantly relates here, salt has shaped civilisation from the beginning, and its story is a glittering, often surprising part of the history of mankind.

"Salt: a world history", by Mark Kurlansky - Homer called it a divine substance. Plato described it as especially dear to the gods. As Mark Kurlansky so brilliantly relates here, salt has shaped civilisation from the beginning, and its story is a glittering, often surprising part of the history of mankind.

"Pale Rider: The Spanish Flu of 1918 and How it Changed the World", by Laura Spinney - With a death toll of between 50 and 100 million people the Spanish flu of 1918–1920 was perhaps the greatest human disaster of the twentieth century. And yet, in our popular conception it exists largely as a footnote to World War I. In Pale Rider, Laura Spinney recounts the story of an overlooked pandemic, tracing it from Alaska to Persia. Telling the story from the point of view of those who lived through…

"Pale Rider: The Spanish Flu of 1918 and How it Changed the World", by Laura Spinney - With a death toll of between 50 and 100 million people the Spanish flu of 1918–1920 was perhaps the greatest human disaster of the twentieth century. And yet, in our popular conception it exists largely as a footnote to World War I. In Pale Rider, Laura Spinney recounts the story of an overlooked pandemic, tracing it from Alaska to Persia. Telling the story from the point of view of those who lived through…

"Astronaut : 1961 onwards (all roles and nationalities) : owners' workshop manual : an insight into the selection, training, equipment, roles and experiences of astronauts", by Ken MacTaggart -  Uncovers the real human experience of astronauts and technical information to provide detail to satisfy those curious about ‘how it works’.

Haynes Astronaut: 1961 Onwards All Roles and Nationalities; An Insight into the Selection, Training, Equipment, R.

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