Māori Tā Moko face marking was a sacred practice among the indigenous tribes of New Zealand. Each moko design was unique to each individual, (no two designs were ever the same as they were never duplicated) and signified a young man’s transition from childhood to manhood. As well as representing rank and status these marks also had significant meaning to the wearer, symbolically connecting them to their ancestors and lineage.

midnight-gallery: “ Māori Tā Moko face marking was a sacred practice among the indigenous tribes of New Zealand. Each moko design was unique to each individual, (no two designs were ever the same as.

New Zealand | "Meri Tupe Otu". ca 1863 - 1875 | © E. S Richards / Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki

Meri Tupe Otu

mister-nobody: “les-sources-du-nil: Edward Smallwood Richards Portrait of Mere Tupe-o-tu, of Taranaki, taken, probably in the late Moriori, Inhabitant of the Chatham Islands ” —.

Maori man, possibly Nikorima Tamaihurihuri, wearing a Maori cloak

Unidentified Maori man, possibly Nikorima Tamaihurihuri, wearing a Maori cloak, taken circa by an unidentified photographer.

New Zealand | Maori Chief Rangitira Anawa ~ scanned postcard; published in the 50s

Maori are the indigenous people of Aotearoa New Zealand. Contemporary Maori culture has been shaped by the traditions of its rich cultural heritage.

Hami Te Hau, [between 1870 and 1890] wearing a korowai (tag cloak), photographed probably by Samuel Carnell of Napier.

Hami Te Hau, [between 1870 and wearing a korowai (tag cloak), photographed probably by Samuel Carnell of Napier.

Two Maori girls dressed in korowai (tag cloaks), with tiki around their necks and feathers in their hair. One is playing whai (string games). Photograph taken by the New Zealand Government Tourist Department circa 1900.

Two Maori girls dressed in korowai (tag cloaks), with tiki around their necks and feathers in their hair. One is playing whai (string games). Photograph taken by the New Zealand Government Tourist Department circa

Unidentified young Maori woman

Maori woman photographed by Frank J Denton, circa 6 April probably in the Wanganui region. She is wrapped in a taniko bordered cape, and has a white tipped feather in her hair. She holds a tewhatewha (Maori fighting staff).

Maori women wearing Kahu huruhuru (feather cloaks) and korowai (tag cloaks), seated outside Te Whai-a-te-Motu meeting house at Mataatua. The woman holding the patu is the wife of Te Whenuanui II. Taken by an unidentified photographer, circa 1910's. ~ They look pretty fierce (esp. the second woman from the right)!

Maori women wearing Kahu huruhuru (feather cloaks) and korowai (tag cloaks), seated outside Te Whai-a-te-Motu meeting house at Mataatua. The woman holding the patu is the wife of Te Whenuanui II.

Group of Maori men, women and children, wearing Maori cloaks, circa 1900. Chief Te Taupua is seated on the left

Group of Maori men, women and children, wearing Maori cloaks, circa Chief Te Taupua is seated on the left. All others are unidentified.

Group from Motueka, [ca 1860s] Group from Motueka outside a whare, circa 1860s. Many are wearing kakahu  (traditional Maori cloaks). Unknown photographer.

Group from Motueka, [ca Group from Motueka outside a whare, circa Many are wearing kakahu (traditional Maori cloaks).

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