Maori Art & Legend

"Drawn from Maori mythology, contemporary culture and oral histories, Reihana’s works communicate complex ideas about indigenous identity in contemporary worlds. With an impressive exhibition record, Reihana‘s work spans film, photography, sculpture, installation and performance. Lisa Reihana lives and works in Auckland." - http://govettbrewster.com
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Maori woman - Tattoo arts are common in the Eastern Polynesian homeland of Māori. Men generally received moko on their faces, buttocks (called raperape) and thighs (called puhoro). Women usually wore moko on their lips (kauae) and chins. Other parts of the body known to have moko include women's foreheads, buttocks, thighs, necks and backs and men's backs, stomachs, and calves.

Young Maori Woman with Moko Wearing Korowai Cloak and Hei Tiki, Foy Brothers, Thames (New Zealander), c. Albumen carte-de-visite photograph, x cm This photograph displays a Maori.

Reihana uses tattoo markings on her figures within her Digital Marae Series. | Maori Moko Tattoos - "originated from the Eastern Polynesian culture of the Maori people... 1,300 CE. "Moko" had cultural and historical meaning. Social hierarchy and coming of age representation... The face was the most important b/c the Maori people considered the head to be the most sacred part of the body. Some woman would wear minimal ink around her lips and her chin."  | Teach Art Wiki

Tattoo History - Images of Maori / New Zealand Tattoos - History of Tattoos and Tattooing Worldwide

Te Herenga Waka Marae | "The interior of Te Herenga Waka whare at Victoria University of Wellington, shown here, contains fine examples of traditional carving and woven tukutuku panels." | Teara Govt NZ

Te Herenga Waka Marae | "The interior of Te Herenga Waka whare at Victoria University of Wellington, shown here, contains fine examples of traditional carving and woven tukutuku panels." | Teara Govt NZ

The Witch's Rock | Maori legend behind Reihana's rendition of the bird woman, "Kurangaituku" | nzetc.victoria.ac.nz

NZ The Witch's Rock, famous in Maori legend. Hatupatu and the bird woman.

Lisa Reihana | YouTube

Lisa Reihana - Colour of Sin: HeadCase Version

Carved interior | "In the tradition of Ruatepupuke, the poupou (wall carvings) inside Tangaroa’s house were able to move and talk. However, they were destroyed by Ruatepupuke in a fire, which is why the carvings of today are no longer able to talk. However, the best carvings, such as these at Te Herenga Waka marae, should look as though they are almost moving and could almost talk." | Teara Govt NZ

Carved interior – Tangaroa – the sea

Tūrongo and Māhinaarangi carving | "This Ngāti Maniapoto carving on Maniaroa marae, Mōkau, represents the intertwined bodies of Tūrongo and Māhinaarangi. Their union is symbolic of the close alliance between the Tainui confederation of tribes in Waikato and the people of the East Coast of the North Island." | Teara Govt NZ

Tūrongo and Māhinaarangi carving

Marae carvings | Tāne carving | This carving of Tāne, god of the forest, is at Te Herenga Waka marae. | Teara Govt NZ

Carving of Tānenui-a-rangi – Māori

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