Maori Gods

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Polynesian Mythology

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The Maori goddess of night, darkness and death; queen of the underworld. She is called 'Great Lady of the Night'. Hine-nui-te-Po is the daughter of Tane and Hina. When she learned that Tane, who took her as his wife, was also her father, she fled to the underworld where she rules ever since.

The Maori goddess of night, darkness and death; queen of the underworld. She is called 'Great Lady of the Night'. Hine-nui-te-Po is the daughter of Tane and Hina. When she learned that Tane, who took her as his wife, was also her father, she fled to the underworld where she rules ever since.

KANALOA - Also called Tangaroa, he is the sea god and a brother of the gods Ku, Lono and Kane.

ELEVEN MORE DEITIES FROM HAWAIIAN MYTHOLOGY

The reaction to my initial list of the Top Eleven Deities In Hawaiian Mythology has been nothing short of phenomenal. Many people indicated they had no idea that the islands had such a large and co…

Mannequin/life caste of a Maori chief wearing a rain cape over a korowai (tag cloak); holding a taiaha (ceremonial and fighting staff), wearing a hei tiki (neck pendant), and two huia feathers in his hair. | 19th century | Photographic print; © The Trustees of the British Museum

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Mannequin/life caste of a Maori chief wearing a rain cape over a korowai (tag cloak); holding a taiaha (ceremonial and fighting staff), wearing a hei tiki (neck pendant), and two huia feathers in his hair. | 19th century | Photographic print; © The Trustees of the British Museum

Ka-moho-aliʻi is a Hawaiian shark god, brother of Kāne Milohai, Pele, Kapo, Nāmaka and Hiʻiaka. He swam in the area around the islands of Maui and Kahoolawe. When a ship was lost at sea, Ka-moho-aliʻi shook his tail in front of the fleet and the kahuna would feed him "awa" (a name for kava, a narcotic drink), and Ka-moho-aliʻi would guide the men home. He is sometimes said to have guided the ships of the original inhabitants of Hawaii from the mainland to their island home in this way.

June 24th, 2013 - Kamohoali'i

Let's get some more figures from Hawaiian mythology on here already! I only have like what, one so far? Today we're making it two with an article about the god Kamohoali'i! Kamohoali'i, also spelt...

Elizabeth Kyle - Kahurangi o te Haeata (Maori for Lady of the Dawn)

hajandrade

Elizabeth Kyle - Kahurangi o te Haeata (Maori for Lady of the Dawn) and Lady of the Dawn

Fig. 91. Maori carved heads.a, weku; b, koruru; c, ruru; d, ngututa; e, manaia (a-d, after Anaha; e, after Archey).

Fig. 91. Maori carved heads. — a, weku; b, koruru; c, ruru; d, ngututa; e, manaia (a-d, after Anaha; e, after Archey) | NZETC

Whakawhiti te Ra...maori sun god

Whakawhiti te Ra

Explore maximas.prime's photos on Flickr. maximas.prime has uploaded 199 photos to Flickr.

In Maori traditions(Aotearoa) Taranga, the mother of Māui, stands over her newborn son, who floats on the ocean. Above her the baby lies on his mother's hair. When he was stillborn she set him into the sea wrapped in her tikitiki, a topknot of hair. Māui became known as Māui-tikitiki-a-Taranga. On one side of Taranga Māui, as a kererū, looks down on his father, and on her other side are Māui's brothers. In this tradition, Māui washed ashore and was raised by his grandfather.

'Taranga'

Taranga, the mother of Māui, stands over her newborn son, who floats on the ocean. Above her the baby lies on his mother's hair. When he was stillborn she set him into the sea wrapped in her tikitiki, a topknot of hair. Māui became known as Māui-tikitiki-a-Taranga. On one side of Taranga M...

In Maori traditions(AotearoaNZ) Hine-tītama was the daughter of the god Tāne(Forest realm) and Hineahuone(the first woman), formed by Tāne from the earth. Hine-tītama later fled to the underworld and became Hine-nui-te-pō, the goddess of death.

'Hine-titama'

Hine-tītama was the daughter of the god Tāne and Hineahuone, formed by Tāne from the earth. Hine-tītama later fled to the underworld and became Hine-nui-te-pō, the goddess of death. Courtesy of Robyn Kahukiwa

RP, Maori Carving, New Zealand, 1920-1940s - (item 34297781 in Postcards... New…

RP, Maori Carving, New Zealand, 1920-1940s

RP, Maori Carving, New Zealand, 1920-1940s in Australia & Oceania > New Zealand

Rongo and Haumia- Maori myth: the god of cultivated food and the god of wild food. They were brothers and both attacked by their other brother, the storm god. They hid in the body of Papa, Mother Earth.

Rongo and Haumia- Maori myth: the god of cultivated food and the god of wild food. They were brothers and both attacked by their other brother, the storm god. They hid in the body of Papa, Mother Earth.

Hine-nui-te-Po, the Maori goddess of night, darkness, and death; the queen of the underworld. She is called 'Great Lady of the Night', daughter of Tane and Hina. When she learned that Tane, who took her as his wife, was also her father, she fled to the underworld where she rules ever since.

Hine-nui-te-Po, the Maori goddess of night, darkness, and death; the queen of the underworld. She is called 'Great Lady of the Night', daughter of Tane and Hina. When she learned that Tane, who took her as his wife, was also her father, she fled to the underworld where she rules ever since.

Tangaroa God, New Zealand  Pouwhenua Maori carved pole of Tangaroa God of the Sea.      Jenny & Tony Enderby Lonely Planet Photographer

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