Rongoa

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Koromiko    Tender leaves were bruised and applied as a poultice for ulcers and veneral disease.  Wet branches were thrown on a fire with whau and karamū, to make a steam bath treatment for broken bones.

Koromiko Tender leaves were bruised and applied as a poultice for ulcers and veneral disease. Wet branches were thrown on a fire with whau and karamū, to make a steam bath treatment for broken bones.

Rātā    The bark of the rātā tree was soaked in water, which was then applied as a lotion.  A poultice of bark was put on sores, wounds and abscesses.  The inner bark was steeped in water and drunk for diarrhoea and dysentery.  Rātā nectar, collected by tapping the flowers against the inside of a calabash, was taken to cure a sore throat.

Rātā The bark of the rātā tree was soaked in water, which was then applied as a lotion. A poultice of bark was put on sores, wounds and abscesses. The inner bark was steeped in water and drunk for diarrhoea and dysentery. Rātā nectar, collected by tapping the flowers against the inside of a calabash, was taken to cure a sore throat.

Kōwhai    The bark of the kōwhai tree was heated in a calabash with hot stones, and made into a poultice for wounds or to rub on a sore back.  A person bitten in the face by a seal had wai kōwhai (kōwhai juice) applied to their wounds, and was well within days.

Kōwhai The bark of the kōwhai tree was heated in a calabash with hot stones, and made into a poultice for wounds or to rub on a sore back. A person bitten in the face by a seal had wai kōwhai (kōwhai juice) applied to their wounds, and was well within days.

Rimu    The inner bark of the rimu tree was beaten into pulp and put on burnt skin.  The pulped bark was combined with water and hot stones in a calabash, and dabbed on ulcers or running sores.  The bark of the young tree was used to stop wounds bleeding.

Rimu The inner bark of the rimu tree was beaten into pulp and put on burnt skin. The pulped bark was combined with water and hot stones in a calabash, and dabbed on ulcers or running sores. The bark of the young tree was used to stop wounds bleeding.

Kawakawa - myfavourite tea(and beer!)

The leaves of the kawakawa plant have a long history of medicinal use. They are still very popular with traditional practitioners for preparing rongoā.

Kūmarahou    Most medicinal uses of kūmarahou were recorded in the 1900s.    The leaves were boiled and used as a soothing and healing agent.  The juice of the leaves was also used in baths.  Drinking the liquid in which leaves had been boiled was said to be good for rheumatism and asthma.

Pomaderris kumeraho Kumarahou Kumarohou is a plant of poor soils and is found from North Cape to Kawhia and the Bay of Plenty. Kumarahou makes lather if the leaves and flowers are crushed and stirred in a bowl of water.

Chrischurch library resources on Rongoa Maori

Holistic healing with New Zealand native flower, fern, tree, seed and plant essences. This definitive ethnobotanical reference book restores the ancient teachings that are the basis of the sacred plant medicine of Aotearoa.

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