Harriet Simeon

Collection by Walking with an Anzac

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Walking with an Anzac
Women's Mobilization for War (New Zealand) | International Encyclopedia of the First World War (WW1)

Women's Mobilization for War (New Zealand) | International Encyclopedia of the First World War (WW1)

New Zealand women became enmeshed in the Great War from its outset. Appealed to as women of the Empire and mothers of soldiers, they were expected to support the war effort, which they did both at home and overseas. While women’s paid work changed only in minor ways, their participation in the volunteer sector was widespread and essential. Women’s organisations also used their maternal citizenship to agitate against war and conscription, and to gain significant welfare reform for women by…

Harriet's portrait

Walking with an Anzac — Your item has a story

The WW100NZ Discovery Box and associated Teacher Resources supporting the Walking with an Anzac Programme.

A meeting of the Lady Liverpool fundraisers in Wellington. Is Harriet amongst them?

'Reminiscences' from Palmerston North Mayor James Nash — Window into WWI

James Alfred Nash (b. 1871) was Mayor of Palmerston North from 1908-1923 and three time MP for the city. He put together this collection of his memories around 1951, one year before his death. The Ian Matheson City Archives holds a complete copy of this work - this section talks ab

Mrs Simeon in 1903

Papers Past | Newspapers | Free Lance | 14 March 1903 | Bath Ron. — Miss Conn, Miss G Morgan, Miss Jones,...

Bath Ron. — Miss Conn, Miss G Morgan, Miss Jones, Miss Kenxer. Front lion — Miss Ha\i>\, Miss Moore, Miss Smunoi/i, Miss Monnis, Mi»s Scabsbuick Miss Bill, Mi-s Bell, Mrs. Simeon. — Muir and Stewait, Photo.

A 1903 photo showing Mrs Simeon in the front row.

Papers Past | Newspapers | Free Lance | 14 March 1903 | Bath Ron. — Miss Conn, Miss G Morgan, Miss Jones,...

Bath Ron. — Miss Conn, Miss G Morgan, Miss Jones, Miss Kenxer. Front lion — Miss Ha\i>\, Miss Moore, Miss Smunoi/i, Miss Monnis, Mi»s Scabsbuick Miss Bill, Mi-s Bell, Mrs. Simeon. — Muir and Stewait, Photo.

Massey University historian Adam Claasen has written an extraordinary book telling the previously untold story of New Zealand's Great War airmen. While much has been written about our Kiwi soldiers at Gallipoli and on the Western Front, Fearless tells the story of more than 800 airmen and a few women flying in open-cockpit wood-and-wire biplanes.

New Zealand’s airmen in the Great War

Massey University historian Adam Claasen has written an extraordinary book telling the previously untold story of New Zealand's Great War airmen. While much has been written about our Kiwi soldiers at Gallipoli and on the Western Front, Fearless tells the story of more than 800 airmen and a few women flying in open-cockpit wood-and-wire biplanes.

Massey University historian Adam Claasen has written an extraordinary book telling the previously untold story of New Zealand's Great War airmen. While much has been written about our Kiwi soldiers at Gallipoli and on the Western Front, Fearless tells the story of more than 800 airmen and a few women flying in open-cockpit wood-and-wire biplanes.

New Zealand’s airmen in the Great War

Massey University historian Adam Claasen has written an extraordinary book telling the previously untold story of New Zealand's Great War airmen. While much has been written about our Kiwi soldiers at Gallipoli and on the Western Front, Fearless tells the story of more than 800 airmen and a few women flying in open-cockpit wood-and-wire biplanes.

Walking with an Anzac — Harriet's Portrait, WW100NZ

Harriet Simeon is proof that Anzac women did much more than just knit socks during the war. Harriet served as a nurse, but after two and half years she enlisted in the brand new Women’s Royal Air Force in 1918. By 1919 Harriet had become the highest ranking New Zealand woman in the WRAF and was promoted to Assistant Air Commandant, an amazing achievement that many people couldn't believe was true.

Walking with an Anzac — Harriet's Portrait, WW100NZ

Harriet Simeon is proof that Anzac women did much more than just knit socks during the war. Harriet served as a nurse, but after two and half years she enlisted in the brand new Women’s Royal Air Force in 1918. By 1919 Harriet had become the highest ranking New Zealand woman in the WRAF and was promoted to Assistant Air Commandant, an amazing achievement that many people couldn't believe was true.

Walking with an Anzac — Harriet's Portrait, WW100NZ

Harriet Simeon is proof that Anzac women did much more than just knit socks during the war. Harriet served as a nurse, but after two and half years she enlisted in the brand new Women’s Royal Air Force in 1918. By 1919 Harriet had become the highest ranking New Zealand woman in the WRAF and was promoted to Assistant Air Commandant, an amazing achievement that many people couldn't believe was true.

Walking with an Anzac — Harriet's Portrait, WW100NZ

Harriet Simeon is proof that Anzac women did much more than just knit socks during the war. Harriet served as a nurse, but after two and half years she enlisted in the brand new Women’s Royal Air Force in 1918. By 1919 Harriet had become the highest ranking New Zealand woman in the WRAF and was promoted to Assistant Air Commandant, an amazing achievement that many people couldn't believe was true.

Harriet explains 'Doping Aeroplanes'

Papers Past | Newspapers | Dominion | 19 February 1920 | WOMAN'S WORLD.

WOMAN'S WORLD. &_ . MATTERS OF INTEREST FROM FAR AND NEAR, .(BV IHOGEM.). SOCIAL AND PERSONAL The death took place at her daughter's residence in. Auckland on Sunday of one of the city's oldest-residents, in the poison of- Mrs. M. E. Eugleton, relict of the late. Caotain Alex., Eagleton. Mrs. Eagleton .arrived in. Auckland with her parents in the ship Minerva, in Novera-. her,. 1847. 'Sho is survived by three Bona, fouif daughters, and many grandchildren Nursing Sisters Harrmvell and Grigor…

Harriet still going strong in 1940

Papers Past | Newspapers | Auckland Star | 11 May 1940 | On Going On Leave

On Going On Leave Ex-servicemen's Corner Trooper Looks Back "... it was an occasion for rejoicing to receive, appropriately enough on April 25, 1916, notification of the allotment of leave to England." These words, from the Official History of New Zealanders in France, hardly convey the full impression of what they meant then. It would be impossible to adequately describe what "leave," especially to "Blighty," meant to the soldier. They say open confession is good for the soul, and since I…

Major Mrs Simeon WAF

Papers Past | Newspapers | Dominion | 18 February 1920 | WOMAN AND THE WAR

WOMAN AND THE WAR WELLINGTON LADY'S RECORD MAJOR (MRS;) SIMEON, W.A.F. Not many people are aware Hint Mrs. b.-K .Simeon, who returned to Wellington from England quietly a few days ago, has to her credit the most distinguished war servicc probably of any woman who left New Zealand to help things along in the hour of the Empire s r' e ti rv ®' meon ft' lo wife of Major u. K Sinieon, of (he Sauioan Force and the ISew Zealand Uifle Brigade, who .wns tor eight years before the war in the employ…

Harriet served at Number 55 General Hospital, British Expeditionary Force, at Wimereux, France, in 1915. Image reference RAMC/801/22/13, Army Medical Service Museum.

British Base Hospitals in France

What was a Base Hospital? The Base Hospital was part of the casualty evacuation chain, further back from the front line than the Casualty Clearing Stations. They were manned by troops of the Royal Army...